Lamenting the Future of the Blues | By Jim Fusilli – WSJ.com

Posted on: Tuesday, Jun 15, 2010

Lamenting the Future of the Blues | By Jim Fusilli – WSJ.com.

Well!  What do you think  – do you agree?



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Grahame

June 15th, 2010 at 22:27
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1

“If you can sound like Stevie Ray Vaughan on electric guitar, you can find a place in today’s blues world.”

Says it all really, doesn’t it? Nice piece with some good points, well made.

As for Glastonbury, think quite a few blues acts are on the world and jazz stages.

Usual stampede of responses though.

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Grahame

June 15th, 2010 at 22:29
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Check out the Bourbon Street stage here, some familiar names . . .

http://www.glastonburyfestivals.co.uk/line-up-poster/

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Ken

June 15th, 2010 at 22:55
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3

Aye – I hadn’t seen the blues acts on the bill before. Well done to all concerned – not a bad gig to have on one’s CV eh?

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Ken

June 15th, 2010 at 22:59
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4

Seasick Steve on the main stage too. What a recent career change for him – lucky guy.

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Pete Evans

June 16th, 2010 at 22:48
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5

Very good article and covering a problem that has crept on us in the last few years with the increasingly regular passings of some of the traditional blues legends.

I think that the purist attitude taken on by some of the blues media has not helped the situation. Often, provided you are African/American and called Blind, Willie or Li’l then you are ok. However, if you are young and white and no matter how good you are musically, there is a slightly snobbish attitude towards your music.

We are not alone in our genre with this as I feel that the biggest snobs are often those in the Classical music world who get very sniffy at the attempts by some new musicians to popularise that music by modernising it.

I’d love to record 2 young white Brit musicians eg Tommy Allen and Johny Hewitt and send the cd for review at some of our purist magazines and pass them off as Delta Johny H and Peg Leg Tom, two newly discovered musicians from a fictitious suburb of Jackson Mississippi and see what response I got.

That aside, there are a number of young American musicians who are working very hard to preserve the blues in its purest form. I can think of young 19 year old Marquise Knox from St Louis, Ben Prestage from Florida (in the region in November) and the fine duo Moreland and Arbuckle.

It may be that over the next 10 years we see some big changes but I am not as pessimistic as the author – I’m sure that everyone will adapt and that whilst most of the old blues people will have departed, there will be a new generation keeping it going.